Reclaimed Water and Alternative Water Supplies

QLH pioneered public access reclaimed water in Florida. Reuse systems designed by QLH in Cocoa Beach and Largo were among the first in the country. Since that time, the firm has designed, permitted and supervised construction of hundreds of miles of reclaimed water transmission and distribution mains, storage facilities, pump stations, reservoirs and augmentation facilities.

Many of the projects have been at the forefront of technology including recovery and recharge systems in Port Orange and DeLand. Many of the clients we serve have been able to beneficially reclaim over 90 percent of the effluent that is normally wasted to surface waters or deep well injection and disposal.

Reclaimed water services and areas of expertise include:

Ken Bern Reclaimed Water Augmentation and Halifax Canal Reclaimed Water Augmentation

City of Port Orange

QLH Reclaimed Water and Alternative Water Supplies Project Civil and Environmental Engineering

The Halifax Canal Reclaimed Water Augmentation project ‘Ken Bern’ was part of a complex system the City of Port Orange has for stormwater recycling as reclaimed water. The Ken Bern project uses an existing wet detention pond that is hydraulically connected to the Halifax Canal. This offline pond allowed for the installation of a surface water intake screen and pumps to recover stormwater from the Halifax Canal. Recovered water is piped to a stormwater treatment train that was installed to the wastewater treatment facility.

The stormwater treatment consists of coagulation, flocculation and filtration to reduce TSS below 5 mg/l. Treated stormwater is blended with wastewater treatment plant effluent prior to disinfection. This combined effluent is distributed to reclaimed water customers or discharged into the city’s reservoirs for future beneficial use. The treatment train is designed to treat a maximum flow of 2.0 MGD.

This project allows the city to harvest an annual average 0.5-1.0 MGD from the Halifax Canal to be used for reclaimed irrigation, prevent it from discharging to an estuarine environment, and gain pollutant removal at 100 percent of the pollutant mass associated with the removal volume. The project fulfilled a city goal to reduce pollutant loading.

The project construction funding was a combination of a 319h Grant from Florida Department of Environmental Protection and cost participation by the city. The 319h Grant provided $535,000 initially and an additional $14,000 due to the project being completed within the designated fiscal year. The working relationship between staff in the Nonpoint Source Management Section of FDEP and QLH continues to be strong.

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Wiley M. Nash WRF Reclaimed Storage and Reservoir-Recharge Basin (Phase I)
and St. Johns Surface Water Intake System (Phase II)

City of DeLand

QLH Reclaimed Water and Alternative Water Supplies Project Civil and Environmental Engineering

The project represents Phase I of DeLand’s integrated reclaimed, storm, surface water storage and recovery program. New storage, pumping and recovery facilities will enable the city to use additional reclaimed water and include stormwater as an augmentation source. Phase II provides for intake and conveyance of up to 4 MGD of surface water from the St. John’s River to the city’s water reclamation facility.

Primary system components include a 3.0 mg storage tank, foundation stabilization, 10 acre reservoir and recharge basin, and high service distribution pumps. The components were constructed on city-owned property at the Wiley M. Nash Water Reclamation Facility. The site is adjacent to the city’s existing regional stormwater pond, which receives pumped stormwater from the entire DeLand drainage basin. The project provides for increased reuse utilization and corresponding decreased effluent discharge to the St. John’s River.

Horizontal wells are designed to enable recovery and filtration of 2,000 GPM (2.88 MGD) on a continuous basis. Additional high service pumps provide for peak distribution capacity of 13 MGD. The Phase I project will immediately yield 1.2 MGD of additional water supply. The Phase II project involves transfer of surface water from the St. John’s River.

The phase II project was bid and awarded separately. It included the following components:

The first phase of the project was completed in 2005 and the phase II has been on-line since July of 2010 and has been providing 1-2 MGD of surface water since that time.

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Reclaimed Water Reservoir Outfall and Filtration Project (Phases I, II and III)

City of Port Orange

QLH Reclaimed Water and Alternative Water Supplies Project Civil and Environmental Engineering

QLH has served as Port Orange’s utility consultant since 1982. The city’s water and sewer projects for the past 30 years were designed and overseen by the firm’s engineering staff. The reclaimed water reservoir and recharge basin project was conceived by QLH as part of a regional program, which would ultimately consist of a series of interconnected reservoirs enabling seasonal storage of reuse and shared utilization of the resource. The project was a required component of the city’s Consumptive Use Permit and St. Johns River Water Management District shared in the cost of construction.

Primary components of this project include a 3.0 mg storage tank, 22,000 linear feet, 24-inch D.I.P., 100- and 75-acre pair of reservoir and recharge basins. The components were constructed on city western wellfield property west of Tomoka Farms Road in Volusia County. This project provides for increased reuse utilization, eliminates effluent discharge to the Halifax River and enhances aquifer recharge. The project also includes the harvest of stormwater to transfer and store in the basins as further reclaimed water supply augmentation and recharge.

The project was designed to enable recovery of 2.0 MGD on a continuous basis. The project will yield 1.0 MGD of additional irrigation water supply. Annual recharge is estimated at 0.8 MGD. The estimated potable water offset provided by reclaimed water is 0.93 MGD.

QLH Reclaimed Water and Alternative Water Supplies Project Civil and Environmental Engineering

Phase I of the three phase project was bid and awarded to Censtate Contractors in 2004 and completed in 2006. A Florida Forever Grant of $2.38 million was received for the project. Phase II was an excavation contract for excavation of the 100-acre reservoir. The bid was awarded to Halifax Paving in 2005. Phase III was for additional mechanical components and electrical systems. The bid was awarded to Wright Construction in 2006 and completed in 2008.

Phase IV was for the Wetland Outfall and Filtration System for reclaimed water recovery. Effluent from the facility is primarily directed to reclaimed water and/or the 175-acre reservoirs. The city has annual average wastewater flows of approximately 6.0 MGD and annual average reclaimed water demand of approximately 5.0 MGD and peak demands up to 9.0 MGD. Seasonal demand can vary dramatically so augmentation is required on a regular basis. The Reservoir Outfall and Filtration project included the following components:

The video related to this project can be viewed at the following site: https://youtu.be/QWngf3WFyXY

The system is fully automated and can be continually monitored via remote telemetry. The reservoir site is not staffed, so monitoring occurs at the city’s wastewater treatment plant that is about 8 miles away. The 2.0 MGD system was designed to be expanded by an additional 2.0 MGD. A second filter would be needed to satisfy the additional capacity. The wetland outfall can be used in lieu of the river discharge. It reduces nutrient loads in the Halifax River and serves to re-hydrate adjacent wetlands. The wetland system is part of the city’s ‘mitigation bank’.

This project was completed in February 2016.

The project accomplished numerous objectives and faced significant regulatory obstacles. The objectives achieved include:

The obstacles faced in permitting the series of projects were also numerous, and the regulatory agencies affected included St. Johns River Water Management District, Florida Department of Environmental Protection, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Fish and Wildlife, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Volusia County. The primary areas of negotiation were:

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Eastern Water Reclamation Facility

City of Deltona

QLH Reclaimed Water and Alternative Water Supplies Project Civil and Environmental Engineering

QLH was the engineer of record for the 5.0 MG pre-stressed concrete reclaimed water storage tank and high service reclaimed pump station, including both mechanical and structural elements. QLH is providing construction engineering and inspection (CEI) services during the 20-month, $24 million contract with full time project representation and a dedicated field engineer.

This is a new facility designed for an ultimate capacity of 4.5 MGD on a 17-acre site. The process includes influent screening, grit removal, biological nutrient removal with membrane bioreactor (MBR) tertiary filtration, chlorine disinfection, public access distribution, and Class AA biosolids treatment using the BCR process. Construction for the project was completed in August 2015. The initial construction will equip one of the three 1.5 MGD treatment trains, one of two 5.0 MG pre-stressed concrete reclaimed water tanks, one of two 2.5 MG pre-stressed concrete reject holding tanks, three of five high service reclaimed water pumps (two 100 gpm, 150 hp pumps and a 50 hp jockey pump), and the full Class AA biosolids treatment process.

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Alexander Avenue Reclaimed Water Storage Tank, Pump Station and Doyle Road Transmission Main

City of Deltona

QLH Reclaimed Water and Alternative Water Supply Project

The City of Deltona owned about 120 acres at a site referred to as the Alexander Avenue property. A portion of the property was designated for use as a water resource management area. This included areas reserved for effluent disposal and stormwater management. Site master planning performed identified property on the south end of the parcel for a proposed ground storage tank and pump station. QLH designed and permitted the proposed 1.0 MG reclaimed water ground storage tank and pump station upgrades at the site. Design included civil, structural, mechanical, electrical and instrumentation drawings.

The scope of engineering services included the design and engineering services required to construct a storage tank and high service pump station. The project included the construction of a 1.0 MG pre-stressed concrete ground storage tank and high service pumping station. Ground storage and pumping was provided at the city-owned parcel on Alexander Avenue. The required design engineering services included geotechnical analysis, data collection, permit application preparation, grant coordination, preparation of construction drawings, specifications and bidding assistance, and construction phase services.

QLH Reclaimed Water and Alternative Water Supplies Project

The overall design scope also included 32,000 linear feet of 20-inch reclaimed water transmission main from the city’s new ‘Eastern’ wastewater treatment plant to the storage tank and pump station and Rapid Infiltration Basin (RIB) site on Alexander Avenue. The reclaimed water main commenced on SR #415 and terminated at the storage tank site. It includes 20-inch HDPE and 20-inch PVC installed via directional drill and open cut, respectively. It was partially funded by a $2 million cost share grant from St. Johns River Water Management District. It included wetland crossings and utility relocation work within Florida Department of Transportation and Volusia County right-of-way.

QLH provided design, construction engineering and inspection, and funding assistance services for the phases of this program, including ‘Eastern’ wastewater treatment plant, RIB site, reuse transmission main, storage tank, pump station and Consumptive Use Permitting. The 40-acre RIB and pump station is an integral part of the regional recharge enhancement program that supports the city’s Consumptive Use Permit and compliance requirements.

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Airport Road Force Main and Reclaimed Water Main

City of Ormond Beach

QLH Reclaimed Water and Alternative Water Supplies Project

QLH prepared the city’s utility Master Plan in 2008. One of the primary projects identified was a new sewage force main connecting the western service area to the wastewater treatment plant. Another significant project was construction of a reclaimed water transmission main to serve the western service area. QLH provided planning, funding, design, permitting, bidding and construction engineering and inspection services for this project.

Initial phases of this project included a 4 MG reclaimed water storage tank and high service pumping station at the wastewater treatment plant. Subsequent phases included about four miles of reclaimed water main and force main piping to convey sewage flow from the western service area and return reclaimed water to storage tanks and distribution systems in Breakaway Trails and Hunter’s Ridge. This project increased annual reclaimed water demand in Ormond Beach by about 2.0 MGD.

QLH Reclaimed Water and Alternative Water Supplies Project

This project consisted of a 16-inch force main replacement which was an extension of the North U.S. 1 force main also designed by QLH. It parallels U.S. 1 and Airport Road in Ormond Beach. The force main conveys flow from Hunter’s Ridge, Breakaway Trails, Destination Daytona and the sewage flow west of the Tomoka River. All pipe work on US 1 was installed via directional drill.

The 20,000 linear feet of reclaimed water main piping ranges in size from 24-inch to 12-inch diameter. It includes crossings of the Tomoka River and I-95. The project includes a series of two booster pumps and control valves to convey reuse to the western service area. QLH provided funding assistance and grant acquisition for this project. A $6 million State Revolving Fund loan and $1.3 million grant from St. Johns River Water Management District were acquired in support of this project. It was completed in 2013.

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West Volusia Water Suppliers Water Interconnects Part A and B

Cities of Deltona, Orange City and Volusia County

QLH Reclaimed Water and Alternative Water Supplies Project

The West Volusia Water Suppliers (WVWS) include the following members: DeLand, Deltona, Orange City and Volusia County. Each of the members own and operate utilities which provide water, sewer and reclaimed water service to residents and customers in unincorporated areas. The four utilities are impacted by the existing Blue Spring Minimum Flow Regime (MFR), which will reduce the volume of groundwater that can be withdrawn within the springshed area. A MFR compliance strategy was developed by the WVWS and adopted by the water management district as a prevention and recovery strategy for the Blue Spring MFR.

A major component of this strategy is using reclaimed water and other lower quality water sources to serve non-potable needs. Interconnecting the utility’s reclaimed water distribution networks is an essential part of this plan. This project consists of the installation of 47,925 linear feet of pipe and will provide about 8 million GPD of reclaimed water transfer capacity. Upon completion, Deland, Deltona and Volusia County will each have the capability to share about 4.0 MGD of non-potable water resources between their respective reuse storage, pumping and distribution systems.

QLH Reclaimed Water and Alternative Water Supplies Project

The QLH team tracked the contractor’s progress by comparison to the approved schedule. Regularly scheduled coordination meetings were conducted. Progress and coordination problems were noted to the contractor within meeting minutes and other correspondence.

The project was divided into two phases, A and B, but it was bid and administered as a single project. QLH prepared the grant applications and administered two cost share grants for this project including a $900,000 planning and design grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and a $2.03 million cost share grant from St. Johns River Water Management District. The project included work within Florida Department of Transportation and Volusia County rights-of-way and a directional drill crossing of U.S. Highway I-4 at Cassadaga Road.

This project had numerous similarities to Mount Dora’s proposed work. The transmission mains ranged in size from 24-inch to 12-inch diameter. The work was within occupied rights-of-way with numerous utility conflicts. There were various tie-in points and connections to serve existing and future customers in addition to relocation of existing water and sewage mains to accommodate the new pipes. Radio telemetry and SCADA components were required in addition to control valves, vaults and flow meters. Similar elements will be required for the Wolf Branch Innovation District projects.

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