Stormwater

Stormwater master planning, infrastructure design and permitting are QLH specialties. The firm has prepared stormwater master plans for the cities of Port Orange, DeLand, Ormond Beach, Edgewater, New Smyrna Beach, Flagler Beach and Volusia County.

Regional treatment systems and innovative treatment technologies have also been designed and constructed for many of these entities. In addition to regional and sub-regional systems, QLH prepares stormwater management facility designs for a wide variety of projects and applications.

Stormwater services and areas of expertise include:

Cambridge Canal Basin Drainage Improvements

City of Port Orange

QLH Stormwater Project Civil and Environmental Engineering

After significant flooding occurred during the tropical storms in 2004, the City of Port Orange retained QLH to study the 700-acre Cambridge Canal basin and recommend improvements. The study recommended a basin-wide approach to solving the problem by creating two additional outfalls, one in the north and one in the south part of the basin. Two large wet detention ponds and a stormwater pump station were constructed to help offset and mitigate for increase discharge rates during extreme events.

The city obtained grant funds through FEMA, St. Johns River Water Management District and Florida Department of Environmental Protection to partly fund the construction. The remainder of the project was funded with State Revolving Fund Loans.

The project is also part of a larger Regional Aquifer Management Program (RAMP). The canal and pond system retains normal rainfall runoff for diversion into the city’s reclaimed water system. The reclaimed water system includes 175 acres of storage and recharge capacity for excess reclaimed water and stormwater. Annually, the stormwater augmentation system contributes over 1 MGD to the water budget.

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Dunlawton Avenue Drainage Improvements and Halifax Canal Reclaimed Water Augmentation

City of Port Orange

QLH Stormwater Project Civil and Environmental Engineering

The subject project is needed in order to solve a significant drainage problem in the area of Dunlawton Avenue (S.R. 421) between the F.E.C. Railroad and Spruce Creek Road. Dunlawton Avenue is a major evacuation route for residents to the east that live not only in Port Orange but also in the communities of Daytona Beach Shores, Wilbur-By-The-Sea and Ponce Inlet. The road has flooded to levels that require lanes to be closed. During the most recent flooding event in May 2009, flood levels reached elevations causing FDOT and the city to close the road for several days.

The city obtained the service of QLH to perform an analysis to determine if there were economically feasible solutions. QLH studied the drainage system and developed a plan to isolate Dunlawton Avenue in this area and provide additional stormwater detention areas with a pumping system that would allow the stages to be reduced below the road level within hours of a storm event. A tide gate was also devised for a two-fold purpose. First, to reduce the impact of the high tides causing additional flooding. And second, to allow for the harvesting of the stormwater in the canal during normal periods for reclaimed water augmentation. The harvested stormwater can be pumped to the wastewater treatment plant filter system to be treated to levels that allow it to be used in the reclaimed water system.

During that same period, the city made application to secure funding through Florida Department of Environmental Protection’s TMDL program. QLH provided the required application information such as water quality improvement data resulting from the expanded pond and reduced discharge to the Halifax River through the reclaimed water augmentation system that was proposed. The grant requires post-construction monitoring of the project to ensure the project will create the improvements stated in the application. QLH has created a Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) to that end which was sent to FDEP for approval. The plan describes the detailed monitoring required of the improvements by collection of inflows and discharges and testing of samples by a certified laboratory. QLH will begin monitoring following the construction was completed September 2013. The city received grant funds totaling $1.25 million from this program to construct the improvements.

An additional source of funding was secured through FDOT’s Joint Participation Agreement. The city had been in talks with FDOT to assist with funding the project for several years. The city had insisted that this was a FDOT problem due to the fact that the road was constructed at elevations below the 100-year floodplain. FDOT had resisted until the flooding that occurred in May 2009. FDOT agreed to assist with a JPA grant in the amount of $2,500,000.

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